Embedded Instruction for Early Learning

Embedded Instruction for Early Learning applies the 3R’s of Early Learning: Relationships, Repetition, Routines to help children learn important skills during everyday activities with familiar people at home, in early learning programs, and in the community. It is important for people who interact regularly with young children to learn how to do embedded instruction, because children learn best during everyday routines and activities with people and things that are part of everyday life.

Embedded Instruction for Early Learning is recognized as a recommended practice nationally and internationally. The Anita Zucker Center and our collaborators have received continuous support for Embedded Instruction for Early Learning from local, state, and national sponsors since 2007. Our research focuses on helping those who interact regularly with young children to learn to do embedded instruction at home, in early learning programs, and in the community.

“It’s really been great to watch [this child] grow and learn. Last year he was barely saying one word to us. Now he is talking [in] full sentences, coming to his friends and asking and answering questions and it’s been great!”

Embedded Instruction for Early Learning Teacher

Elements of Embedded Instruction

Embedded Instruction for Early Learning has four key parts that are interconnected:

“I have been working in early intervention for many years and the hardest thing has always been [knowing] how to engage families.  Now I have concrete skills to engage them.  It’s very rewarding to hear Mom say, ‘I know how my child learns.’”

Early Intervention Provider

Center Priorities

Generating Knowledge
Research on Embedded Instruction for Early Learning has led to its identification as a recommended practice in early childhood.

Engaging with Partners
Our work on Embedded Instruction for Early Learning has engaged local, state, national, and international partners who use embedded instruction in homes, early  learning programs, and communities.

Preparing Leaders
Future early childhood leaders from undergraduate through post-doctoral levels at the University of Florida and at collaborating institutions of higher education have participated in Embedded Instruction for Early Learning activities since 2007.

Making an Impact
Embedded Instruction for Early Learning has had impacts throughout the United States and the world.

“The whole family has gotten involved…Now we are not doing things without thinking about them. Now we do them a little more intentionally. Every time we are going to do something, we try to apply something we have already learned.”

Caregiver

Impact

Research on Embedded Instruction for Early Learning shows:

  • familiar adults can learn to use embedded instruction.
  • People who use embedded instruction and report that it is helpful for them and for children.
  • embedded instruction helps children learn skills in everyday routines and activities as they interact with familiar people and things.
  • embedded instruction helps children use the skills they learn in different routines and activities.
  • embedded instruction helps children continue to use the skills they learn over time.

“I got rid of my bag of toys. I didn’t need to bring it because we were working with what [the family] had.  It was easier for [parents] to provide opportunities throughout their day.”

Early Intervention Provider

Preschool Teachers

Early Intervention Providers Supported

Children and Families Supported

“[Embedded Instruction for Early Learning is] one of the most helpful tools…that I learned in my time being a teacher… it’s so rewarding to see how much progress you’re seeing so frequently, and it is so effective, and you have the data right in front of you…”

Embedded Instruction for Early Learning Teacher